Writing Notes

Text about this section.

The Craft of Writing
Work Habit
  • Real writers make time every day to hone their craft and meet their writing goals and obligations (whether this is an external obligations or self imposed).
  • A less talented writer with a strong work habit will almost always be more successful than a writer with more talent but who is not as disciplined.
  • Accomplishing your writing goals requires that you work towards a schedule that clearly states when each task needs to be be complete by.
  • Spending your time writing is a conscious choice. Those who invest time into it will improve while those who merely think about writing will not.
  • Finding the time to write requires a certain level of planning, but using the time you have productively requires dedication.
  • Writers don’t sit around and wait for inspiration to strike.¬†They write even if they feel uninspired. They write no matter what the situation or their mood.
  • Like any other form of work, the act of writing is often not enjoyable while you do it, although inspiration will occasionally strike. Most of the time, writing requires a certain level of discipline that needs to be built over time.
  • Beginning writers should build discipline by committing to writing a half hour or a full hour each day (or set a goal to write a certain amount of words per day).
  • Develop a habit of writing at the same time each day until the act of writing becomes routine.

 

Completing Large Projects
  • Most complex projects can be broken down in to a series of simple tasks. You will eventually complete the project if you tackle each task in order.
  • The more you write, the better you will be at estimating the amount of time required to complete a task.
  • Break large writing projects into major sections (chapters for example). Then further divide them into manageable tasks.
  • Meeting mini deadlines can bolster your confidence and make your feel good (provided they are meaningful accomplishments).
  • Set goals that are S.M.A.R.T. (specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound).
  • Create an ordered list of each required task.
  • When planning a project schedule, choose the completion date and then list each task in reverse order to see when they must be completed in order to meet the deadline.
  • Don’t break your tasks down to the point where they must be constantly carried over from day-to-day. Just jot down what can be reasonably accomplished in a given day.
  • Some people like to use organizational software or websites such as www.toodledo.com to organize their tasks. Pen and paper work just fine as well. It is a matter of using what you are most comfortable with and which provides quicker results.
Dialogue

Text placeholder.

Character Design

Text placeholder.

Editing

Text placeholder.

Writing Links

Text about this section.

Dialogue

Text placeholder.

Character Design

Text placeholder.

Editing

Text placeholder.